Advanced Salt States: Going Beyond YAML
2020-02-04, 16:00–16:50, B.2.011

Using an automation system such as SaltStack is a great way to ensure that traditional servers and desktops are kept in a consistent state. Commonly run tasks such as software updates and configurations can be done in a way that the results are always consistent. When using SaltStack this is accomplished using state files.

These state files are usually written using YAML, a human-readable data-serialization language, that presents the dictionaries and lists that SaltStack uses into a friendly format. Occasionally we need to go beyond the capabilities of what YAML can provide.

In this talk we'll explore some of the other ways that Salt states can be written, including using Jinja formatting and writing state files in programming languages such as Python.


Using an automation system such as SaltStack is a great way to ensure that traditional servers and desktops are kept in a consistent state. Commonly run tasks such as software updates and configurations can be done in a way that the results are always consistent. When using SaltStack this is accomplished using state files.

These state files are usually written using YAML, a human-readable data-serialization language, that presents the dictionaries and lists that SaltStack uses into a friendly format. Occasionally we need to go beyond the capabilities of what YAML can provide.

In this talk we'll explore some of the other ways that Salt states can be written, including using Jinja formatting and writing state files in programming languages such as Python.