Philipp Krenn

Philipp lives to demo interesting technology. Having worked as a web, infrastructure, and database engineer for over ten years, Philipp is now working as a developer advocate at Elastic — the company behind the Elastic Stack consisting of Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats, and Logstash. Based in Vienna, Austria, he is constantly traveling Europe and beyond to speak and discuss open source software, search, databases, infrastructure, and security.

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Talks

seccomp — Your Next Layer of Defense

Why should you allow all possible system calls from your application when you know that you only need some? If you have ever wondered the same then this is the right talk for you. We are covering:

  • What is seccomp in a nutshell and where could you use it.
  • Practical example with Elasticsearch and Beats.
  • How to collect seccomp violations with Auditd.

Because your security approach can always use an additional layer of protection.

Observability is More than Logs, Metrics & Traces

You know the drill: DevOps is using tool(s) X. So obviously, observability can be solved by throwing some tools together as well; generally logs, metrics, and traces often called the trifecta of observability.

But observability is not a tool — it is a property of a system. Moving from many small blackboxes to a more holistic view of your system. It includes tools, but not exactly three distinct features (especially if your solution happens to support those). For example, if half your user base cannot access your service because of some bad DNS settings and external health checks are not part of your trifecta, you are none the wiser.

This is not (just) a rant, but a look at the actual value to be added and some approaches to it. Like turning your logs into richer events that align with your business. Which is not solved by fancy tools alone.